Commentary

The end of immunology?

Historical insight: It is not uncommon in science that a leading figure in a discipline will declare that all its problems have been solved and that there is little left to do. This has happened several times in immunology, but the field has survived each such declaration and continues its exciting course.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Institute of the History of Medicine, Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, 1900 East Monument St., Baltimore, MD 21205, USA.arts@jhmi.edu

    • Arthur M. Silverstein

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