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Dendritic cell regulation of TH1-TH2 development

Abstract

Understanding the control exerted by cytokines on T helper cell subsets 1 and 2 (TH1-TH2) development has progressed to a fairly satisfying knowledge of intracellular signals and transcription factors. Less is understood about the molecular basis of TH1-TH2 development exerted by other parameters, such as how the antigen presenting cell can influence this process. Recent work suggests that dendritic cell subsets contribute significant polarizing influences on T helper differentiation, but how this comes about is less clear. In some cases known pathways may be used, as in the dendritic cell subset 1 exerting TH1 polarization by interleukin 12 (IL-12) production and STAT4 activation. In others, the effects are still in need of explanation.

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Figure 1: Model of DC migration and effects on innate and adaptive immunity.
Figure 2: Mouse and human DC classes regulate the type of T cell–mediated immune response.
Figure 3

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Acknowledgements

M.M. thanks O. L. Urbain for helpful discussions, R. Maldonado-Lopez for Figures 1 and 2. M. M. is a Research Associate of the Belgian Fonds National de la Recherche Scientifique.

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Correspondence to Kenneth M. Murphy.

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Note added in proof: The personal communication by I. Weisman mentioned on p200 is to be published as, Traver, D. et al. Development of CD8α+ dendritic cells from a common myeloid progenitor. Science (in the press, 2000).

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Moser, M., Murphy, K. Dendritic cell regulation of TH1-TH2 development. Nat Immunol 1, 199–205 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1038/79734

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