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Calcium signaling in immune cells

Nature Immunology volume 10, pages 2127 (2009) | Download Citation

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  • An Erratum to this article was published on 01 February 2009

This article has been updated

Abstract

Calcium acts as a second messenger in many cell types, including lymphocytes. Resting lymphocytes maintain a low concentration of Ca2+. However, engagement of antigen receptors induces calcium influx from the extracellular space by several routes. A chief mechanism of Ca2+ entry in lymphocytes is through store-operated calcium (SOC) channels. The identification of two important molecular components of SOC channels, CRACM1 (the pore-forming subunit) and STIM1 (the sensor of stored calcium), has allowed genetic and molecular manipulation of the SOC entry pathway. In this review, we highlight advances in the understanding of Ca2+ signaling in lymphocytes with special emphasis on SOC entry. We also discuss outstanding questions and probable future directions of the field.

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Change history

  • 16 January 2009

    NOTE: In the version of this article initially published, the published online date is 17 January 2009 and the ovals indicating store-dependent channels in the bottom row of Figure 2 are blue. The published online date should be 17 December 2008 and the ovals should be black . The errors have been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

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Acknowledgements

We thank P. Rao and D. Okuhara for discussions and J.W. Putney for critical reading of this manuscript, and we apologize to those colleagues whose work we could not cite because of space limitations. Supported by the Cancer Research Institute–Irvington Institute Fellowship Program (M.V.) and the US National Institutes of Health (GM 053950 to J.-P.K.).

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Affiliations

  1. Laboratory of Allergy and Immunology, Department of Pathology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115, USA.

    • Monika Vig
    •  & Jean-Pierre Kinet

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Competing interests

M.V. & J.-P.K. are consultants for Synta Pharmaceuticals.

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Correspondence to Monika Vig.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.f.220

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