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Feeling stressed? It might be your T cells

Nature Immunology volume 18, pages 12811283 (2017) | Download Citation

Abolishing signals mediated by the inhibitory receptor PD-1 results in a systemic decrease in tryptophan and tyrosine, which leads to a striking deficiency in the neurotransmitters serotonin and dopamine in the brain and anxiety-like behavior and exacerbated fear.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Laura Strauss, Nikolaos Patsoukis and Vassiliki A. Boussiotis are in the Division of Hematology-Oncology and Department of Medicine Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • Laura Strauss
    • , Nikolaos Patsoukis
    •  & Vassiliki A Boussiotis

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Competing interests

V.A.B. holds patents on the PD-1 pathway licensed by Bristol-Myers Squibb, Roche, Merck, EMDSerono, Boehringer Ingelheim, AstraZeneca, Novartis and Dako.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Vassiliki A Boussiotis.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.3872

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