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Integrative biology of T cell activation

Nature Immunology volume 15, pages 790797 (2014) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The activation of T cells mediated by the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) requires the interaction of dozens of proteins, and its malfunction has pathological consequences. Our major focus is on new developments in the systems-level understanding of the TCR signal-transduction network. To make sense of the formidable complexity of this network, we argue that 'fine-grained' methods are needed to assess the relationships among a few components that interact on a nanometric scale, and those should be integrated with high-throughput '-omic' approaches that simultaneously capture large numbers of parameters. We illustrate the utility of this integrative approach with the transmembrane signaling protein Lat, which is a key signaling hub of the TCR signal-transduction network, as a connecting thread.

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  • 25 August 2014

    In the version of this article initially published, the page ranges for references 7 and 15 were missing. Those are 815-823 (ref. 7) and 808-814 (ref. 15). The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

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Acknowledgements

This paper is dedicated to the memory of François Kourilsky. We thank R. Germain and P. Bongrand for discussions. Supported by the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale, Aix-Marseille Université, French National Infrastructure for Mouse Phenogenomics (PHENOMIN), Agence Nationale de Recherche (Basilic project to M.M.) and European Research Council (“Integrate” grant to B.M.).

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Affiliations

  1. Centre d'Immunologie de Marseille-Luminy, UM2 Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France.

    • Bernard Malissen
    • , Claude Grégoire
    • , Marie Malissen
    •  & Romain Roncagalli
  2. INSERM U1104, Marseille, France.

    • Bernard Malissen
    • , Claude Grégoire
    • , Marie Malissen
    •  & Romain Roncagalli
  3. CNRS UMR7280, Marseille, France.

    • Bernard Malissen
    • , Claude Grégoire
    • , Marie Malissen
    •  & Romain Roncagalli
  4. Centre d'Immunophénomique, UM2 Aix-Marseille Université, Marseille, France.

    • Bernard Malissen
    •  & Marie Malissen
  5. INSERM US012, Marseille, France.

    • Bernard Malissen
    •  & Marie Malissen
  6. CNRS UMS3367, Marseille, France.

    • Bernard Malissen
    •  & Marie Malissen

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Bernard Malissen.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2959

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