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Serine-threonine kinases in TCR signaling

Nature Immunology volume 15, pages 808814 (2014) | Download Citation

Abstract

T lymphocyte proliferation and differentiation are controlled by signaling pathways initiated by the T cell antigen receptor. Here we explore how key serine-threonine kinases and their substrates mediate T cell signaling and coordinate T cell metabolism to meet the metabolic demands of participating in an immune response.

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Affiliations

  1. Instituto Investigación Sanitaria/Hospital Universitario de la Princesa, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.

    • María N Navarro
  2. The College of Life Sciences, Division of Cell Signalling and Immunology, University of Dundee, Dundee, UK.

    • Doreen A Cantrell

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Doreen A Cantrell.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2941

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