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The self-obsession of T cells: how TCR signaling thresholds affect fate 'decisions' and effector function

Nature Immunology volume 15, pages 815823 (2014) | Download Citation

Abstract

Self-reactivity was once seen as a potential characteristic of T cells that was eliminated by clonal selection to protect the host from autoimmune pathology. It is now understood that the T cell repertoire is in fact broadly self-reactive, even self-centered. The strength with which a T cell reacts to self ligands and the environmental context in which this reaction occurs influence almost every aspect of T cell biology, from development to differentiation to effector function. Here we highlight recent advances and discoveries that relate to T cell self-reactivity, with a particular emphasis on T cell antigen receptor (TCR) signaling thresholds.

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Acknowledgements

Supported by the US National Institutes of Health (PO1 AI35296, RO1 AI088209 and R37 AI39560 to K.A.H., and R01 AI75168 and R37 AI38903 to S.C.J.).

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  1. Center for Immunology and Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA.

    • Kristin A Hogquist
    •  & Stephen C Jameson

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Kristin A Hogquist or Stephen C Jameson.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2938

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