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NF-κB control of T cell development

A Corrigendum to this article was published on 19 September 2017

This article has been updated

Abstract

The NF-κB signal transduction pathway is best known as a major regulator of innate and adaptive immune responses, yet there is a growing appreciation of its importance in immune cell development, particularly of T lineage cells. In this Review, we discuss how the temporal regulation of NF-κB controls the stepwise differentiation and antigen-dependent selection of conventional and specialized subsets of T cells in response to T cell receptor and costimulatory, cytokine and growth factor signals.

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Figure 1: The canonical and noncanonical NF-κB signal transduction pathway.
Figure 2: NF-κB and early T cell development.
Figure 3: NF-κB and αβ T cell selection and maturation.
Figure 4: TCR activation of NF-κB.

Change history

  • 08 May 2017

    In the version of this article initially published, the top middle portion of Figure 4a was incorrect. The MHC and TCR should be on the left, and the B7 and CD28 should be on the right (diagrams and labels for both). The error has been corrected in the HTML and PDF versions of the article.

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Acknowledgements

We acknowledge support from the National Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (program grant 1016701 and project grant 1029822 to S.G.).

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Gerondakis, S., Fulford, T., Messina, N. et al. NF-κB control of T cell development. Nat Immunol 15, 15–25 (2014). https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2785

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