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C-type lectin receptors orchestrate antifungal immunity

Abstract

Immunity to pathogens critically requires pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) to trigger intracellular signaling cascades that initiate and direct innate and adaptive immune responses. For fungal infections, these responses are primarily mediated by members of the C-type lectin receptor family. In this Review, we highlight recent advances in the understanding of the roles and mechanisms of these multifunctional receptors, explore how these PRRs orchestrate antifungal immunity and briefly discuss progress in the use of these receptors as targets for antifungal and other vaccines.

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Figure 1: Structure of the fungal cell wall.
Figure 2: Transmembrane CLRs involved in antifungal immunity and their intracellular signaling pathways.
Figure 3: Integration of CLR-mediated signaling directs adaptive immunity.
Figure 4: CLRs mediate inflammasome activation.

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Hardison, S., Brown, G. C-type lectin receptors orchestrate antifungal immunity. Nat Immunol 13, 817–822 (2012). https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2369

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