Review Article | Published:

Hierarchies of NF-κB target-gene regulation

Nature Immunology volume 12, pages 689694 (2011) | Download Citation

Abstract

Members of the NF-κB family of transcription factors function as dominant regulators of inducible gene expression in almost all cell types in response to a broad range of stimuli, with particularly important roles in coordinating both innate and adaptive immunity. This review summarizes the present knowledge and recent progress toward elucidating the numerous regulatory layers that confer target-gene selectivity in response to an NF-κB-inducing stimulus.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, University of California, Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California, USA.

    • Stephen T Smale

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Stephen T Smale.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2070

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