Crosstalk in NF-κB signaling pathways

Abstract

NF-κB transcription factors are critical regulators of immunity, stress responses, apoptosis and differentiation. A variety of stimuli coalesce on NF-κB activation, which can in turn mediate varied transcriptional programs. Consequently, NF-κB-dependent transcription is not only tightly controlled by positive and negative regulatory mechanisms but also closely coordinated with other signaling pathways. This intricate crosstalk is crucial to shaping the diverse biological functions of NF-κB into cell type– and context-specific responses.

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Figure 1: Canonical and noncanonical pathways of NF-κB activation.
Figure 2: TRAF- and RIP1-dependent signaling pathways.
Figure 3: NF-κB-independent functions of IKK complex subunits.
Figure 4: Crosstalk mechanisms involving NF-κB subunits.

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Acknowledgements

Supported by the US National Institutes of Health (R37-AI33443) and the American Heart Association (A.O.).

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Correspondence to Sankar Ghosh.

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Oeckinghaus, A., Hayden, M. & Ghosh, S. Crosstalk in NF-κB signaling pathways. Nat Immunol 12, 695–708 (2011). https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.2065

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