Review Article | Published:

Effector T cell plasticity: flexibility in the face of changing circumstances

Nature Immunology volume 11, pages 674680 (2010) | Download Citation

Abstract

As more states of CD4 T cell differentiation are uncovered, their flexibility is also beginning to be recognized. Components that control the plasticity of CD4 T cell populations include cellular conditions, clonality, transcriptional circuitry and chromatin modifications. Appearance of cellular flexibility may arise from truly flexible genetic programs or, alternatively, from heterogeneous populations. New tools will be needed to define the rules that allow or prohibit cellular transitions.

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Acknowledgements

The authors would like to acknowledge T. Murphy for discussion and careful reading of the manuscript.

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  1. Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Department of Pathology & Immunology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri, USA.

    • Kenneth M Murphy
  2. Division of Molecular Immunology, Medical Research Council National Institute for Medical Research, London, UK.

    • Brigitta Stockinger

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ni.1899

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