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Biogeochemistry

Mercury methylation made easy

Nature Geoscience volume 2, pages 9293 (2009) | Download Citation

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  • An Erratum to this article was published on 30 January 2009

The exact mechanism used by microorganisms to produce the neurotoxin methyl mercury is unclear. The latest laboratory studies point to the amino acid cysteine as an important aid for the uptake of inorganic mercury and its transformation to methyl mercury in Geobacter sulfurreducens.

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Affiliations

  1. Richard Sparling is at the Department of Microbiology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 2N2, Canada.  Richard_Sparling@umanitoba.ca

    • Richard Sparling

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo428

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