News & Views | Published:

Rise and fall of the Martian moons

Nature Geoscience volume 9, pages 568569 (2016) | Download Citation

The two small satellites of Mars are thought to have accreted from a debris disk formed in a giant impact. Simulations suggest the moons were shepherded into formation by the dynamical influence of one or more short-lived massive inner moons.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    In Mars (eds Kieffer, H. H., Jakosky, B. M., Snyder, C. W. & Matthews, M. S.) 1283–1301 (Univ. Arizona Press, 1992).

  2. 2.

    Icarus 211, 1150–1161 (2011).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nature Geosci. , (2016).

  4. 4.

    & Nature 309, 138–140 (1984).

  5. 5.

    , & Nature 453, 1216–1219 (2008).

  6. 6.

    , & Astron. J. 117, 603–620 (1999).

  7. 7.

    & Nature Geosci. 8, 913–917 (2015).

  8. 8.

    Annu. Rev. Earth Planet. Sci. 42, 551–578 (2014).

  9. 9.

    , & Planet. Space Sci. 102, 176–182 (2014).

  10. 10.

    et al. J. Geophys. Res. Planets (2016).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Erik Asphaug is in the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University, PO Box 876004, Tempe, Arizona 85287, USA

    • Erik Asphaug

Authors

  1. Search for Erik Asphaug in:

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Erik Asphaug.

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2755

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing