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Tectonics

The biggest break-up

Nature Geoscience volume 1, pages 499500 (2008) | Download Citation

Almost immediately after all the Earth's continents were amalgamated into the supercontinent Pangaea, rifting began to tear it apart. Subduction of the oceanic region of the Pangaean plate beneath its own continental margin may have been the trigger.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Christophe Pascal is at the Geological Survey of Norway, 7491 Trondheim, Norway.  christophe.pascal@ngu.no

    • Christophe Pascal

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo270

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