Commentary | Published:

Climate change before the court

Nature Geoscience volume 9, pages 35 (2016) | Download Citation

In the absence of an enforceable set of commitments to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, concerned citizens may want to supplement international agreements on climate change. We suggest that litigation could have an important role to play.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Client Earth, Fieldworks, 274 Richmond Road, Martello Street Entrance, London E8 3QW, UK

    • James Thornton
    •  & Howard Covington

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to James Thornton.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2612

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