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Carbon accumulation in European forests

Abstract

European forests are intensively exploited for wood products, yet they also form a sink for carbon. European forest inventories, available for the past 50 years, can be combined with timber harvest statistics to assess changes in this carbon sink. Analysis of these data sets between 1950 and 2000 from the EU-15 countries excluding Luxembourg, plus Norway and Switzerland, reveals that there is a tight relationship between increases in forest biomass and forest ecosystem productivity but timber harvests grew more slowly. Encouragingly, the environmental conditions in combination with the type of silviculture that has been developed over the past 50 years can efficiently sequester carbon on timescales of decades, while maintaining forests that meet the demand for wood. However, a return to using wood as biofuel and hence shorter rotations in forestry could cancel out the benefits of carbon storage over the past five decades.

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Figure 1: Whole tree standing carbon stocks as a function of total NPP (green), woody NPP (brown) and harvest removals (red).
Figure 2: Evolution of NPP as a function of forest area from national data averaged over for the EU-15, excluding Luxembourg, plus Norway and Switzerland.
Figure 3: Observed trend of forest biomass stocks and future predictions.

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Acknowledgements

This article benefited from the work done under the CAMELS project (EVK2-CT-2002-00151) the CARBOEUROPE-IP project (No. GOCE-CT-2003-505572) and the GREENCYCLES Marie Curie RTN (MRTN-CT-2004-512464), all funded by the European Commission. P.C. acknowledges the support of Commissariat à l'Energie Atomique in France. S.L. was funded by the Research Foundation, Flanders (FWO-Vlaanderen).

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Ciais, P., Schelhaas, M., Zaehle, S. et al. Carbon accumulation in European forests. Nature Geosci 1, 425–429 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo233

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