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Seafloor methane: Atlantic bubble bath

Nature Geoscience volume 7, pages 625626 (2014) | Download Citation

The release of large quantities of methane from ocean sediments might affect global climate change. The discovery of expansive methane seeps along the US Atlantic margin provides an ideal test bed for such a marine methane–climate connection.

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  1. John Kessler is in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA

    • John Kessler

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Correspondence to John Kessler.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo2238

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