Palaeoclimatology

A tale of two climates

The generally warm and ice-free conditions of the Eocene epoch rapidly declined to the cold and glaciated state of the Oligocene epoch. Geochemical evidence from deep-sea sediments resolves in detail the climatic events surrounding this transition.

Access options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: The Eocene to Oligocene climate transition as recorded in foraminiferal oxygen-isotope records from all major ocean basins1.

References

  1. 1

    Zachos, J. Pagani, M., Sloan, L., Thomas, E. & Billups, K. Science 292, 686–693 (2001).

  2. 2

    Coxall, H. K. & Pearson, P. N. Geol. Soc. London (2007).

  3. 3

    Katz, M. E. et al. Nature Geosci. 1, 329–334 (2008).

  4. 4

    Kennett, J. P. & Shackleton, N. J. Nature 260, 513–515 (1976).

  5. 5

    Lear, C. H, Bailey, R., Pearson, P. N., Coxall, H. K. & Rosenthal, Y. Geology 36, 251–254 (2008).

  6. 6

    Fairbanks, R. Nature 342, 637–642 (1989).

  7. 7

    Miller, K. et al. Science 310, 1293–1298 (2005).

  8. 8

    DeConto, R. M. & Pollard, D. Nature 421, 245–249 (2003).

  9. 9

    Bolli, H. M., Beckmann, J. P. & Saunders, J. B. Benthic Foraminiferal Biostratigraphy of the South Caribbean Region (Cambridge Univ. Press, 1994).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

Authors

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Cite this article

Billups, K. A tale of two climates. Nature Geosci 1, 294–295 (2008). https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo191

Download citation