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Geomagnetism

Hum from the quiet zone

Nature Geoscience volume 5, pages 161162 (2012) | Download Citation

During the middle of the Cretaceous period, the polarity of Earth's magnetic field remained stable. A magnetic survey of oceanic crust formed during that time, however, suggests that the field intensity was surprisingly variable.

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Affiliations

  1. John A. Tarduno is in the Department of Earth & Environmental Sciences and the Department of Physics & Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14627, USA

    • John A. Tarduno

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Correspondence to John A. Tarduno.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ngeo1413

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