News & Views | Published:

The Iceland map

Nature Genetics volume 31, pages 225226 (2002) | Download Citation

Subjects

Gene hunters and others who carry out linkage or association studies now have a powerful new tool in the form of a human genetic map with about five times the resolution of previous maps. Because individual variation in levels of meiotic recombination may limit the precision of genetic distances that can be obtained by genotyping polymorphisms in families, new strategies for building genetic maps of very high resolution will be required.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Nature Genet. 31 (2002); advance online publication, 10 June 2002 (doi:10.1038/ng917).

  2. 2.

    et al. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 63, 861–869 (1998).

  3. 3.

    et al. Nature 380, 152–154 (1996).

  4. 4.

    et al. Genet. Epidemiol. 19, 366–380 (2000).

  5. 5.

    et al. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 70, 593–603 (2002).

  6. 6.

    et al. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 68, 874–883 (2001).

  7. 7.

    et al. Nature 409, 951–953 (2001).

  8. 8.

    et al. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 70, 1469–1479 (2002).

  9. 9.

    et al. Nature Genet. 29, 217–222 (2001).

  10. 10.

    et al. Cell 51, 319–337 (1987).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Center for Medical Genetics, Marshfield Medical Research Foundation, Marshfield, Wisconsin 54449, USA. weberj@cmg.mfldclin.edu

    • James L. Weber

Authors

  1. Search for James L. Weber in:

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng920

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing