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Unifying the genetics of behavior

Nature Genetics volume 31, pages 329330 (2002) | Download Citation

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A recent study of the geotactic response in fruit flies demonstrates how current genomic strategies may be combined with traditional quantitative and classical genetics to identify genes underlying complex behavioral phenotypes. Naturally-occurring variation in behavior seems to arise from mild alterations in pleiotropic genes.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, Nevada 89154-4004, USA.debelle@ccmail.nevada.edu

    • J. Steven de Belle

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  1. Search for J. Steven de Belle in:

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng915

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