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Cellular clockwork

Nature Genetics volume 32, pages 559560 (2002) | Download Citation

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A new study identifies a cell-autonomous two-hour clock in diverse types of mammalian cells in culture. The two-hour oscillations depend on negative feedback of a gene product, Hes1, on transcription of its own gene—a regulatory mechanism that is identical to the circadian clock. Although a similar two-hour clock is required for vertebrate somitogenesis, the physiological role of the two-hour clock in cells remains unclear.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Biology, New York University, 100 Washington Square East, New York, New York 10003, USA. mnitabach@acedsl.com or justin.blau@nyu.edu

    • Michael N. Nitabach
    •  & Justin Blau

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1202-559

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