News & Views | Published:

Lost in translation

Nature Genetics volume 29, pages 358359 (2001) | Download Citation

Subjects

Translation initiation is a tightly regulated process, central to cell function, and proteins involved in this process and its regulation are highly conserved throughout evolution. New results show that mutations in genes encoding subunits of the ubiquitously expressed eIF2B translation initiation factor are responsible for a rare neurological disorder in humans—leukoencephalopathy with vanishing white matter (VWM). The eIF2/eIF2B complex has a key role in the response to a variety of stress conditions. Notably, mutations affecting other proteins of this complex or regulatory kinases cause distinct disorders.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

References

  1. 1.

    et al. Neurology 48, 845–855 (1997).

  2. 2.

    et al. Nature Genet. 29, 383–388 (2001).

  3. 3.

    et al. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 65, 728–734 (1999).

  4. 4.

    et al. Neurology 51, 540–547 (1998).

  5. 5.

    et al. Nature Genet. 25, 406–409 (2000).

  6. 6.

    , , , & Eur. J. Pediatr. 138, 120–129 (1982).

  7. 7.

    et al. Mol. Cell 7, 1153–1163 (2001).

  8. 8.

    et al. Mol. Cell 7, 1165–1176 (2001).

  9. 9.

    et al. J. Biol. Chem. 274, 5723–5730 (1999).

  10. 10.

    et al. Biochem. J. 318, 637–643 (1996).

  11. 11.

    , & Pediatr. Pathol. Lab. Med. 17, 487–496 (1997).

  12. 12.

    , , , & Hormone Res. 50, A215 (1998).

  13. 13.

    et al. Am. J. Hum. Genet. (in the press).

  14. 14.

    & Nature Cell Biol. 2, 207–209 (2000).

Download references

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Institut Pasteur, Laboratoire de Génétique de la Prédisposition aux Maladies Infectieuses, Paris, France. cjulier@pasteur.fr

    • Cécile Julier

Authors

  1. Search for Cécile Julier in:

About this article

Publication history

Published

DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1201-358

Newsletter Get the most important science stories of the day, free in your inbox. Sign up for Nature Briefing