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Theoretical and empirical issues for marker-assisted breeding of congenic mouse strains

Nature Genetics volume 17, pages 280284 (1997) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Congenic breeding strategies are becoming increasingly important as a greater number of complex trait linkages are identified. Traditionally, the development of a congenic strain has been a time-consuming endeavour, requiring ten generations of backcrosses. The recent advent of a dense molecular genetic map of the mouse permits methods that can reduce the time needed for congenic-strain production by 18–24 months. We present a theoretical evaluation of marker-assisted congenic production and provide the empirical data that support it. We present this ‘speed congenic’ method in a user-friendly manner to encourage other investigators to pursue this or similar methods of congenic production.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Millennium Pharmaceuticals, 640 Memorial Drive, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA.

    • Paul Markel
    • , Pei Shu
    • , Deborah L. Nagle
    • , John S. Smutko
    •  & Karen J. Moore
  2. The McLaughlin Research Institute, Great Falls, Montana 59405, USA.

    • Chris Ebeling
    •  & George A. Carlson

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Correspondence to Karen J. Moore.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1197-280

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