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Communal discourse as a supplement to informed consent for genetic research

Nature Genetics volume 17, pages 277279 (1997) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Genetic technologies present unique problems for the practice of informed consent. They provide information that may affect a study participant's family or kindred, which may be identifiable as an ethnic or locally isolated population. That information may be used to construct adverse perceptions of such identifiable populations, including non-participants who may not have been informed of or consented to the analyses. To address collective implications of genetic research, we describe a process that can supplement individual consent. Our approach engages pre-existing social units in discourses about proposed research. Communal discourses can influence individuals' decisions to participate in research studies.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Department of Anthropology, University of Oklahoma, Norman, Oklahoma 73019, USA.

    • Morris W. Foster
  2. Oklahoma Oncology, Inc., 1705 East 19th Street, Suite 201, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74104, USA.

    • Ann J. Eisenbraun
  3. William K. Warren Medical Research Institute, Department of Medicine, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73190, USA.

    • Thomas H. Carter

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Correspondence to Morris W. Foster.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1197-277

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