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Jackson-Weiss and Crouzon syndromes are allelic with mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2

A Correction to this article was published on 01 April 1995

Abstract

Jackson-Weiss syndrome is an autosomal dominant condition characterized by craniosynostosis, foot anomalies and great phenotypic variability. Recently mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2) have been found in patients with another craniosynostotic syndrome, Crouzon syndrome. FGFR2 is a member of the tyrosine kinase receptor superfamily, having a high affinity for peptides that signal the transduction pathways for mitogenesis, cellular differentiation and embryogenesis. We now report an FGFR2 mutation in the conserved region of the immunoglobulin Illc domain in the Jackson-Weiss syndrome family in which the syndrome was originally described. In addition, in four of 12 Crouzon syndrome cases, we identified two new mutations and found two previously described mutations in the same region.

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Jabs, E., Li, X., Scott, A. et al. Jackson-Weiss and Crouzon syndromes are allelic with mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. Nat Genet 8, 275–279 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1194-275

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