Genome-wide tagging for everyone

The recently completed International HapMap Project has provided detailed information about patterns of genetic variation in four different population samples. Two new studies show that the patterns of variation documented in the HapMap can be applied to other human populations, suggesting it is time to establish a standardized platform for all whole-genome association studies.

Access optionsAccess options

Rent or Buy article

Get time limited or full article access on ReadCube.

from$8.99

All prices are NET prices.

Figure 1: The two determinants of tag transferability are proximity between the reference and target populations and, more importantly, the amount of association between variants (LD) in the target population.

References

  1. 1

    Wade, N. New York Times 30 October 2002.

  2. 2

    Hinds, D.A. et al. Science 307, 1072–1079 (2005).

  3. 3

    de Bakker, P.I. et al. Nat. Genet. 37, 1217–1223 (2005).

  4. 4

    Montpetit, A. et al. PLoS Genet. 2, e27 (2006).

  5. 5

    Mueller, J.C. et al. Am. J. Hum. Genet. 76, 387–398 (2005).

  6. 6

    De Bakker P.I. et al. Nat. Genet. 38, 1298–1303 (2006).

  7. 7

    Conrad, D.F., et al. Nat. Genet. 38, 1251–1260 (2006).

  8. 8

    Ahmadi, K.R. et al. Nat Genet. 37, 84–89 (2005).

  9. 9

    International HapMap Consortium. Nature 437, 1299–1320 (2005).

  10. 10

    Haines, J.L. et al. Science 308, 419–421 (2005).

Download references

Author information

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

About this article

Further reading