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Birc1e is the gene within the Lgn1 locus associated with resistance to Legionella pneumophila

Nature Genetics volume 33, pages 5560 (2003) | Download Citation

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Abstract

In inbred mouse strains, permissiveness to intracellular replication of Legionella pneumophila is controlled by a single locus (Lgn1), which maps to a region within distal Chromosome 13 that contains multiple copies of the gene baculoviral IAP repeat–containing 1 (Birc1, also called Naip; refs. 1,​2,​3). Genomic BAC clones from the critical interval were transferred into transgenic mice to functionally complement the Lgn1-associated susceptibility of A/J mice to L. pneumophila. Here we report that two independent BAC clones that rescue susceptibility have an overlapping region of 56 kb in which the entire Lgn1 transcript must lie. The only known full-length transcript coded in this region is Birc1e (also called Naip5).

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Acknowledgements

The authors thank A. MacKenzie and D. Malo for their help and support, N. Gendron and J. Penney for expert technical assistance, members of the McGill Mouse Genetics Group for use of the BAC transgenic core and L. Simard and C.J. DiDonato for BAC clone 227n6. This work was supported by grants from the Network of Centers of Excellence (Canadian Genetic Diseases Network) to P.G. P.G. is supported by a Distinguished Scientist award and E.D. by a studentship from the Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The BAC transgenic core was supported by a grant from Innovation Quebec.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Biochemistry, McGill University, 3655 Sir William Osler Promenade, Montreal, Quebec H3G-1Y6, Canada.

    • Eduardo Diez
    • , Susan Gauthier
    • , Michel Tremblay
    •  & Philippe Gros
  2. Department of Biochemistry, Microbiology and Immunology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.

    • Seung-Hwan Lee
    •  & Silvia Vidal
  3. Department of Pediatrics, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada.

    • Zahra Yaraghi
  4. McGill Cancer Center, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.

    • Michel Tremblay
    •  & Philippe Gros

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The authors declare no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Philippe Gros.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1065