Review Article | Published:

Protein microarrays and proteomics

Nature Genetics volume 32, pages 526532 (2002) | Download Citation

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Abstract

The system-wide study of proteins presents an exciting challenge in this information-rich age of whole-genome biology. Although traditional investigations have yielded abundant information about individual proteins, they have been less successful at providing us with an integrated understanding of biological systems. The promise of proteomics is that, by studying many components simultaneously, we will learn how proteins interact with each other, as well as with non-proteinaceous molecules, to control complex processes in cells, tissues and even whole organisms. Here, I discuss the role of microarray technology in this burgeoning area.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology, and Bauer Center for Genomics Research, Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138, USA macbeath@chemistry.harvard.edu

    • Gavin MacBeath

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1037