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Abstract

Measurement of gene-expression profiles using microarray technology is becoming increasingly popular among the biomedical research community. Although there has been great progress in this field, investigators are still confronted with a difficult question after completing their experiments: how to validate the large data sets that are generated? This review summarizes current approaches to verifying global expression results, discusses the caveats that must be considered, and describes some methods that are being developed to address outstanding problems.

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Affiliations

  1. Pathogenetics Unit, Laboratory of Pathology and Urologic Oncology Branch, Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, Maryland 20892, USA.

    • Rodrigo F. Chuaqui
    • , Robert F. Bonner
    • , Carolyn J.M. Best
    • , John W. Gillespie
    • , Michael J. Flaig
    • , Stephen M. Hewitt
    • , John L. Phillips
    • , David B. Krizman
    • , Michael A. Tangrea
    • , Mamoun Ahram
    • , W. Marston Linehan
    • , Vladimir Knezevic
    •  & Michael R. Emmert-Buck

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Competing interests

Michael Emmert-Buck is an inventor on multiple allowed patents and patent applications covering LCM, LES, and expression microdissection, and is entitled to receive royalty payments through the NIH technology transfer program. LCM is licensed by Arcturus Engineering (http://www.arctur.com). LES is licensed by 20/20 GeneSystems (http://www.2020gene.com).

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Correspondence to Michael R. Emmert-Buck.

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https://doi.org/10.1038/ng1034