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How many diseases does it take to map a gene with SNPs?

“They all talked at once, their voices insistent and contradictory and impatient, making of unreality a possibility, then a probability, then an incontrovertible fact, as people will when their desires become words.” —W. Faulkner, The Sound and the Fury, 1929

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Figure 1: Schematic model of trait aetiology.

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Acknowledgements

Support to J.D.T. is acknowledged from a Hitchings-Elion Fellowship from the Burroughs-Wellcome Fund, and to K.M.W. from NIH grant HL 58239. The opinions in this article are the personal views of the authors, and do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the funders.

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Weiss, K., Terwilliger, J. How many diseases does it take to map a gene with SNPs?. Nat Genet 26, 151–157 (2000). https://doi.org/10.1038/79866

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