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Do all SINEs lead to LINEs?

Nature Genetics volume 24, pages 332333 (2000) | Download Citation

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More than 30% of the human genome consists of retroposed sequences—including retroposons and processed genes—but retroposition events are rare. New experimental methods that accelerate retroposition are now clarifying the mechanisms that shape the genome.

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Affiliations

  1. Department of Molecular Biophysics and Biochemistry, Yale University School of Medicine, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, Connecticut 06520, USA.  weiner@biomed.med.yale.edu

    • Alan M Weiner

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https://doi.org/10.1038/74135

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