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The human body as microbial observatory

Nature Genetics volume 30, pages 131133 (2002) | Download Citation

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The human body is grossly contaminated with microbes and, for the most part, this is beneficial. Consequently, the finding of microbial and viral transcripts within human EST databases should not come as a big surprise. However, the extent of human-associated microbial diversity and the possible role of infectious agents in common human diseases remains relatively unknown. An increasingly detailed understanding of the human genome will allow us to distinguish between endogenous human transcripts and those expressed by microbial residents.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Departments of Microbiology & Immunology, and Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, California, USA. relman@stanford.edu

    • David A. Relman

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng0202-131

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