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Following the herd

Nature Genetics volume 39, pages 78 (2007) | Download Citation

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The ability to digest lactose into adulthood is a recently evolved trait that has risen to high frequency in some human populations, coincident with the introduction of cattle domestication. A new study shows that variants responsible for this trait arose independently in Europeans and Africans, providing a striking example of convergent evolution.

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Affiliations

  1. Stephen P. Wooding is at the McDermott Center for Human Growth and Development, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, 6000 Harry Hines Boulevard, Dallas, Texas 75390, USA.  stephen.wooding@utsouthwestern.edu

    • Stephen P Wooding

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng0107-7

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