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Telomeres, p21 and the cancer-aging hypothesis

Nature Genetics volume 39, pages 1112 (2007) | Download Citation

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Telomere dysfunction suppresses cancer through the p53 tumor suppressor pathway but also contributes to aging. A new study suggests that these effects of dysfunctional telomeres may be separable, such that aging—but not cancer suppression—depends on the p21 cell cycle inhibitor.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Jessica F. Bell and Norman E. Sharpless are in the Departments of Medicine and Genetics, The Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599, USA. nes@med.unc.edu

    • Jessica F Bell
    •  & Norman E Sharpless

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng0107-11

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