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Mismatch repair prefers exons

Nature Genetics volume 49, pages 16731674 (2017) | Download Citation

A new analysis of cancer genomes identifies a decrease in the mutation burden of exons, but not introns, as compared to expectation. This difference can be explained by preferential recruitment of the DNA mismatch repair machinery to a protein modification that marks exons.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Dashiell J Massey and Amnon Koren are in the Department of Molecular Biology and Genetics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA.

    • Dashiell J Massey
    •  & Amnon Koren

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Amnon Koren.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.3993

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