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A developmental program drives aggressive embryonal brain tumors

Nature Genetics volume 46, pages 23 (2014) | Download Citation

Embryonal tumors with multilayered rosettes (ETMRs) are primitive neuroectodermal tumors arising in infants. A new study shows that these tumors are universally driven by fusion of the promoter of a gene with brain-specific expression, TTYH1, to C19MC, the largest human microRNA cluster, activating a fetal neural development program.

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Affiliations

  1. Tenley C. Archer and Scott L. Pomeroy are in the Department of Neurology, Boston Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

    • Tenley C Archer
    •  & Scott L Pomeroy

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Competing interests

The authors declare no competing financial interests.

Corresponding author

Correspondence to Scott L Pomeroy.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.2857

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