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One gene's shattering effects

Nature Genetics volume 44, pages 616617 (2012) | Download Citation

A new study shows that three independent mutations in the Sh1 gene, which encodes a YABBY transcription factor, gave rise to the non-shattering seed phenotype in domesticated sorghum. This same gene may have also had a role in the domestication of other cereals, including maize and rice.

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Acknowledgements

The author thanks X. Li and J. Yu for assistance with the geographical distribution of Sorghum races shown in Figure 1b.

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Affiliations

  1. Kenneth M. Olsen is at the Department of Biology at Washington University, Saint Louis, Missouri, USA.

    • Kenneth M Olsen

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The author declares no competing financial interests.

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Correspondence to Kenneth M Olsen.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/ng.2289

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