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Renewable energy policy: Enumerating costs reduces support

Renewable energy policies enjoy greater support compared to policies focused explicitly on climate change, and thus present a politically plausible path toward carbon emission reduction. However, new research shows that renewable energy policy support declines when people are informed about the policy costs for home energy bills.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Darrick Evensen is at the School of Psychology, Cardiff University, Cardiff CF10 3AT, Wales, UK.

    • Darrick Evensen

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Darrick Evensen.