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Wind energy in China: Getting more from wind farms

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China has the largest installed capacity of wind farms, yet its wind energy electricity output is lower than that of other countries. A new analysis of the relative contributions of the factors influencing China's wind sector could help policy makers prioritize solutions.

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Figure 1: China's 2015 wind power curtailment rate by province.
Figure 2: Annual power capacity additions in China by generation type (bars) and annual share of non-fossil capacity (purple line).

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Correspondence to Joanna I. Lewis.

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Lewis, J. Wind energy in China: Getting more from wind farms. Nat Energy 1, 16076 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/nenergy.2016.76

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