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Batteries: Getting solid

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Materials with high ionic conductivity are urgently needed for the development of solid-state lithium batteries. Now, an inorganic solid electrolyte is shown to have an exceptionally high ionic conductivity of 25 mS cm−1, which allows a solid-state battery to deliver 70% of its maximum capacity in just one minute at room temperature.

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Figure 1: Configurations of solid-state batteries and fabrication processes for performance improvement.

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Correspondence to Yong-Sheng Hu.

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Hu, YS. Batteries: Getting solid. Nat Energy 1, 16042 (2016). https://doi.org/10.1038/nenergy.2016.42

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