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Defects in perovskite-halides and their effects in solar cells

Nature Energy volume 1, Article number: 16149 (2016) | Download Citation

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Abstract

Solar cells based on perovskite-halide light absorbers have a unique set of characteristics that could help alleviate the global dependence on fossil fuels for energy generation. They efficiently convert sunlight into electricity using Earth-abundant raw materials processed from solution at low temperature. Thus, they offer potential for cost reductions compared with or in combination with other photovoltaic technologies. Nevertheless, to fully exploit the potential of perovskite-halides, several important challenges must be overcome. Given the nature of the materials — relatively soft ionic solids — one of these challenges is the understanding and control of their defect structures. Currently, such understanding is limited, restricting the power conversion efficiencies of these solar cells from reaching their thermodynamic limit. This Review describes the state of the art in the understanding of the origin and nature of defects in perovskite-halides and their impact on carrier recombination, charge-transport, band alignment, and electrical instability, and provides a perspective on how to make further progress.

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Acknowledgements

A.P. and J.M.B. thank the European Union Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) for funding under grant agreement no. 604032 of the MESO project.

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  1. Center for Nanoscience and Technology, Italian Institute of Technology, via Giovanni Pascoli 70/3, Milano 20133, Italy.

    • James M. Ball
    •  & Annamaria Petrozza

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https://doi.org/10.1038/nenergy.2016.149

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