Figure 2: Total abundance between 1993 and 2012 for ten EAAF migratory shorebird taxa. | Nature Communications

Figure 2: Total abundance between 1993 and 2012 for ten EAAF migratory shorebird taxa.

From: Rapid population decline in migratory shorebirds relying on Yellow Sea tidal mudflats as stopover sites

Figure 2

(af) Taxa are ordered from highest to lowest Yellow Sea reliance, the proportion of the flyway population that stages on Yellow Sea tidal mudflats to refuel for long-distance migrations. (a) Menzbieri bar-tailed godwit; (b) far eastern curlew; (c) curlew sandpiper; (d) great knot; (e) red knot; (f) lesser sand plover; (g) baueri bar-tailed godwit; (h) terek sandpiper; (i) red-necked stint; and (j) grey-tailed tattler. Total abundance estimates are posterior means from Bayesian N-mixture models of counts across Australia and New Zealand, including the majority of internationally important sites. Lines show posterior mean abundance estimates for each year, with red lines indicating taxa with credibly declining populations and grey shading denoting the 95% CRI. Overall trend estimates appear in Table 1. Detection probabilities for each taxon ranged from 0.52 to 0.68 (Supplementary Fig. 1) and were reflected in modelled abundances and trend estimates. Posterior predictive checks indicated good model fit in all cases (Supplementary Fig. 2).

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