Figure 3: Oleic acid inhibits rTRPV1 activation by voltage and capsaicin. | Nature Communications

Figure 3: Oleic acid inhibits rTRPV1 activation by voltage and capsaicin.

From: Inhibition of TRPV1 channels by a naturally occurring omega-9 fatty acid reduces pain and itch

Figure 3

(a) Currents activated by voltage (60 mV) in the presence of 4 μM capsaicin (left), and after 20 (middle) and 40 (right) s of application of 5 μM OA. (b) The normalized conductance obtained from currents shown in a. In the absence of OA (no OA), blue; 20 s after OA, turquoise; 40 s after OA, pink. A fit to equation (1) (see Methods) is shown by the black curves. (c) The value of the voltage of half activation, V1/2, as a function of time after OA exposure, n=8 patches. For no OA=−63±9.2 mV, 20 s after OA=44±12.9 mV and 40 s after OA=73.5±13.4 mV. (d) The value of the steepness of the Boltzmann fit, qa, as a function of time after OA exposure (n=8 patches). No OA=0.54±0.018 eo, 20 s after OA 0.51±0.23 eo and 40 s after OA 0.46±0.37 eo. (e) Effect of OA on the single-channel activity of rTRPV1. Representative traces of a single-channel recording experiment at 120 mV. Traces are numbered according to: no OA, which is the activity in the presence of 4 μM capsaicin before 5 μM OA application and 6, 12 and 40 s after OA. (f) Average time course of the effect of OA on the single-channel open probability of TRPV1. Each point is the open probability as calculated from 1.2 s of recording (n=4). Error bars are s.e.m. Time zero indicates the moment of application of OA+capsaicin. The pink curve is a fit to an exponential function with time constant 6.2 s.

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