Figure 7: Multiple non-mutually exclusive hypothetical mechanisms could cause genotype–environment interactions for microbiome composition. | Nature Communications

Figure 7: Multiple non-mutually exclusive hypothetical mechanisms could cause genotype–environment interactions for microbiome composition.

From: Host genotype and age shape the leaf and root microbiomes of a wild perennial plant

Figure 7

Each panel shows the ambient microbial community for two environments (abstracted as coloured circles); the expressed phenotypes of two different host genotypes (abstracted as funnels that are labelled with the plant genotype); and the resulting microbiome of the genetically distinct plants in each environment. In a the genetic variant is expressed in both environments (that is, there is no phenotypic plasticity) but it affects only certain microbes, which are absent from Environment 2. As a result, genetic diversity for the trait is expressed in both environments, but genetic diversity for the microbiome is only observed in Environment 1. In b, environmental variation alters the phenotype expressed by plant genotype B, but not plant genotype A (that is, there is genetic variation for phenotypic plasticity, or a genotype–environment interaction for the functional trait). As a result, host genotype affects microbiome composition only in Environment 2, even though the ambient communities are identical in both environments.

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