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Agricultural impacts

Mapping future crop geographies

Nature Climate Change volume 6, pages 544545 (2016) | Download Citation

Modelled patterns of climate change impacts on sub-Saharan agriculture provide a detailed picture of the space- and timescales of change. They reveal hotspots where crop cultivation may disappear entirely, but also large areas where current or substitute crops will remain viable through this century.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. William R. Travis is an Associate Professor in the Department of Geography, University of Colorado, Boulder, Colorado 80309-0260, USA

    • William R. Travis

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Correspondence to William R. Travis.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2965

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