Commentary | Published:

Influence of internal variability on Arctic sea-ice trends

Nature Climate Change volume 5, pages 8689 (2015) | Download Citation

  • A Correction to this article was published on 21 May 2015

This article has been updated

Internal climate variability can mask or enhance human-induced sea-ice loss on timescales ranging from years to decades. It must be properly accounted for when considering observations, understanding projections and evaluating models.

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  • 16 April 2015

    In the Commentary ‘Influence of internal variability on Arctic sea-ice trends' (Nature Clim. Change 5, 86–89; 2015), in Fig. 3c, the x-axis label for pause length of 20 years was incorrectly repeated. Corrected after print 16 April 2015.

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Acknowledgements

We thank Nathan Gillett and Greg Flato for comments. We acknowledge the World Climate Research Programme's Working Group on Coupled Modelling, which is responsible for CMIP, and we thank the climate modelling groups for producing and making available the model output, listed in Supplementary Table 1.

Author information

Affiliations

  1. Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis, Environment Canada, Victoria, British Columbia V8W 2Y2, Canada

    • Neil C. Swart
    •  & John C. Fyfe
  2. National Centre for Atmospheric Science, Department of Meteorology, University of Reading, Reading RG6 6BB, UK

    • Ed Hawkins
  3. Department of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, University of Colorado at Boulder, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    • Jennifer E. Kay
  4. National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, Colorado, USA

    • Alexandra Jahn

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Neil C. Swart.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2483

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