Commentary | Published:

Renegotiating the global climate stabilization target

Nature Climate Change volume 4, pages 747748 (2014) | Download Citation

Climate policy has gained focus with the adoption of the 2 °C target, but action to avoid dangerous climate change has not occurred as expected. It is time to reconsider the target, and most importantly, the relationship between climate science and policy.

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Author information

Affiliations

  1. Oliver Geden is at the German Institute for International and Security Affairs (SWP), Ludwigkirchplatz 3-4, 10119 Berlin, Germany

    • Oliver Geden
  2. Silke Beck is at the Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research (UFZ), Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig, Germany

    • Silke Beck

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Corresponding author

Correspondence to Oliver Geden.

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DOI

https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate2309

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