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Mitigation win–win

Win–win messages regarding climate change mitigation policies in agriculture tend to oversimplify farmer motivation. Contributions from psychology, cultural evolution and behavioural economics should help to design more effective policy.

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Figure 1: Flying the flag for low-carbon farming.

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Acknowledgements

We thank A. Dunsire for designing Fig. 1. We also acknowledge our financial supporters: the Scottish Government Rural and Environmental Science and Analytical Services division through ClimatexChange (http://www.climatexchange.org.uk/) and AnimalChange, financially supported from the European Community's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/ 2007–2013) under the grant agreement number 266018.

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Correspondence to Dominic Moran.

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Moran, D., Lucas, A. & Barnes, A. Mitigation win–win. Nature Clim Change 3, 611–613 (2013). https://doi.org/10.1038/nclimate1922

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